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Are curses of Chandrababu & KCR led to BJP, Congress missing bus in Karnataka?

By   /  May 16, 2018  /  No Comments

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Hyderabad, May 16 (NSS)Chief Ministers of the two Telugu States of Andhra Pradesh and Telangana N. Chandrababu Naidu and K. Chandrashekhar Rao respectively, might be gloating for their own selfish reasons over the fractured mandate in the recently held prestigious elections in Karnataka State.

Chandrababu Naidu might be reeling with a vicarious pleasure in putting brakes to the allout efforts of BJP to secure a clear majority and come to power in Karnataka. The saffron party has narrowly missed the bus as it faced defeat in many constituencies where the Telugus voted against it with vengeance for denying the Special Category Status (SCS) to Andhra Pradesh.

After the BJP-led Union government denied the SCS to AP, its ally TDP, the ruling party in the Andhra Pradesh, not only severed its connection with the saffron party, but also has taken cudgels against the Modi Government. During the no-holds-barred campaign in the Karnataka elections, Naidu called upon the Telugus to vote against the BJP and instead support former Prime Minister M Deve Gowda’s JD-(S). What is more, many senior TDP leaders even campaigned vigorously in this direction and thus put the brakes for BJP march to clinch power in a Southern State. Thus Naidu undoubtedly became a fly in the ointment for BJP’s efforts to rule for the first time a Southern State.

On the other hand, Telangana Chief Minister K. Chandrasekhar Rao, who was eyeing to play a major role in national politics with his plans to form an anti-Congress and anti-BJP Federal Front, is definitely elated  that the people of Karnataka have rejected both the national parties by denying them a clear mandate. In fact, the fractured mandate has in a way come as a shot in the arm for KCR, who has been espousing the imminent need for achieving a “Congress-BJP-mukt Bharat” holding both the national parties solely responsible for all the ills and non-development of the States in the country.

It is pertinent to recall here that KCR in his plans to form a Federal Front against the two national parties has stepped up his efforts by meeting leaders of various parties like  West Bengal Chief Minister Mamata Banerjee, Deve Dowda and Kumaraswamy of JD(S), Akilesh Yadav of SP, M.K. Stalin and Kanimozhi of DMK and so on. He tried to sell his idea of the need for forming a Federal Front to free the country from stranglehold of both the Congress and the BJP. Though all these leaders have endorsed his views regarding formation of a Federal Front, many of them had their own reservations about shunning the Congress in this direction.

Thus though KCR, heart in heart, is happy that the Karnataka electorate have expressed their apathy towards both the Congress and BJP by not giving them a clear mandate and thus in a way supported his animosity towards the two national parties, the post-poll scenario unfolding in that State might act as a damper in his political moves at the national level. Firstly, the JD(S) aligning with the Congress to form a government in Karnataka might not be of liking for KCR. What is more, both Mamata Banerjee of TMC and Mayavathi of BSP played a crucial role in making JD(S) to sail with the Congress for the formation of government in Karnataka.

Therefore, these unexpected developments in the political scenario, which undoubtedly are not good in his exercise to forge a Federal Front, KCR might be forced to revise his stance and re-draw his plans to make his foray into national politics. While all the Opposition parties are antagonized towards the saffron party, there seems to be also a strong feeling among them that it would not be possible to forge an alternative to the BJP without Congress.

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